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    The Three Stooges Show

    The Three Stooges Show

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    AMC (ended 1959)
    The Three Stooges are Moe Howard, Larry Fine, and at various times, Shemp Howard, Curly Howard, Joe Besser, or Curly-Joe DeRita. They are three good-hearted fools who have a knack for screwing up even the simplest task. A typical episode of The Three Stooges Show includes Moe slapping Larry, several eye pokes, head conks, and the ever possible pie fight. Destruction seems to follow the Stooges around!moreless
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    Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego?

    Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego?

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    PBS (ended 1995)
    Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego?, based on the popular computer game, was first seen in September of 1991 and became one of the most popular kids' game shows of all time. The series aired on PBS, probably the best place to reach it's target audience. Like the computer game, the game show's basic purpose was to ultimatly capture the head of an international crime syndicate. In this case, the head was Carmen Sandiego and in each episode she would send one of her henchmen out to steal a national landmark. The contestants job was to use their knowledge of geography to track each criminal from country to country and city to city with the goal of capturing the henchman, restoring the landmark to it's home, and whom ever got enough points would have the chance to capture Carmen. The game show was hosted by Greg Lee and the contestants were given orders from The Chief, played by Lynne Thigpen, who ran the ACME Detective Agency. Rockapella was the singing group that sang the popular theme song and helped give the contestants clues. The V.I.L.E. Henchmen Carmen's henchman consisted of Vic the Slick, The Contessa, Robocrook, Top Grunge, Eartha Brute, Patty Larceny and Double Trouble. The Contessa left at the end of the 1st season and returned in the 4th season with a new look. At the beginning of the second season, Kneemoi and Wonder Rat joined the ranks of the other henchman, followed by Sarah Nade in the 3rd Season. In 1996, the original format of the series came to an end. That fall, the series was redesigned and renamed Where in Time is Carmen Sandiego?
    Theme Song: "Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego?" Written by: Sean Altman & David Yazbek
    Sung by: Rockapella Spinoffs: Where in Time is Carmen Sandiego? First Telecast: September 1991
    Last Telecast: September 1996 Episodes: 295 Color Episodes PBS Broadcast History September 1991-September 1996----Weekdaysmoreless
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    The Rifleman

    The Rifleman

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    ABC (ended 1963)
    In an unusual twist on the standard Western, widower Lucas McCain struggles to successfully homestead his ranch in North Fork, New Mexico territory, while raising his son Mark with integrity & common sense. In the 1880s, the Marshall of North Fork has his hands full handling the weekly "bad guys," & it is frequently necessary for Lucas to pick up his modified rapid-action Winchester Rifle to protect himself, his son, and his neighbors. The show included many guest appearances from later big-name actors, who were just getting started at the time.moreless
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    Wagon Train

    Wagon Train

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    NBC (ended 1965)
    Wagon Train followed the trials and tribulations of pioneering families as they set out from the East to carve out a new life in the West soon after the American Civil War. For some of the travellers it was a happy ending, but not for all, which only heightened the drama along the way. Such a structure ensured that the scriptwriters had a wide scope for their stories which , more often than not, revolved around the characters rather than the action, although the series had more than it's fair share of that too. With a new storyline nearly every week and a larger than average budget for the time, it was never difficult for the producers to attract well known guest stars in front of the cameras with some famous names behind the cameras too. Wagon Train was a hit on both sides of the Atlantic between 1957 and 1965. It survived cast changes to the leading actors and changes to the format which is testimony enough to the show's popularity. Even now fans who watched it back then remember it with fondness, and regular re-runs ensure it's continuing popularity with newer generations.moreless
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    The Walking Dead

    The Walking Dead

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    AMC
    The world we knew is gone. An epidemic of apocalyptic proportions has swept the globe causing the dead to rise and feed on the living. In a matter of months society has crumbled. In a world ruled by the dead, we are forced to finally start living. Based on a comic book series of the same name by Robert Kirkman, this AMC project focuses on the world after a zombie apocalypse. The series follows a police officer, Rick Grimes, who wakes up from a coma to find the world ravaged with zombies. Looking for his family, he and a group of survivors attempt to battle against the zombies in order to stay alive.moreless
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    What's My Line?

    What's My Line?

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    CBS (ended 1967)
    Welcome to the What's My Line? guide at TV.com! Show Type: Game Show with Panel. First Telecast: February 2, 1950. Last Telecast: September 3, 1967. Producers: Mark Goodson & Bill Todman. Schedule: Currently not being aired on GSN or any other station. Synopsis: What's My Line? was one of network television's longest running and most beloved prime time game shows with a broadcast run of seventeen and one-half years. The game consisted of four panelists trying to guess the occupation of a guest contestant. As the questioning rotated, a panel member asked questions and the guest would answer either "yes" or "no." A contestant received $5 for each "no" answer. Ten "no" answers ended the game in favor of the contestant. A mystery guest segment was also included in which the panelists were blindfolded. The mystery guests were paid $500 as an appearance fee whether they won or lost the game. This was in addition to the maximum $50 game winnings. Guest panelists were paid $750 as an appearance fee. The regular panelists were under contract and were paid "much more" stated Gil Fates in his 1978 What's My Line? book. From 1950-1967, John Daly hosted the "classic" CBS What's My Line?, to which this site is devoted. In September 1968, What's My Line? was revived as a syndicated daily show (M-F) which lasted until 1975. Thanks for visiting us! Enjoy your stay! And now... TIME FOR EVERYBODY'S FAVORITE GUESSING GAME!moreless
  • 7
    Tosh.0

    Tosh.0

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    Comedy Central
    Comedian Daniel Tosh is the host of this rambunctious program that ranges from the absurd to the profane, the humorously silly to the shockingly irreverent. Built around a unique byproduct of the Internet age, the viral video, Tosh and company scour the Internet searching for the most intriguing, disgusting and entertaining of these mini-cinematic gems and present them with a narrative that is witty, provocative, insightful and outrageous. Add to that Tosh's interviews, skits, and other unclassifiable bits and it's almost guaranteed that you'll find something that will offend you or make you laugh out loud-probably at the same time.moreless
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    Wheel of Fortune

    Wheel of Fortune

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    Wheel of Fortune is in its 26th season (2008-2009 Season) with Pat Sajak & Vanna White. Wheel debuted in 1982.Wheel of Fortune has been renewed through the 2011-2012 season.

    One of the most successful game shows in history, Wheel of Fortune actually is a version of the children's game Hangman (with a large carnival wheel and prizes added). The game show, which did modestly well in the 1970s, became a worldwide phenomenon in the 1980s through syndication and made household names out of its hosts, Pat Sajak and Vanna White. Simply put, the Wheel has never stopped spinning since its premiere as an NBC daytime show that winter day in January 1975. (Ironically, the series replaced Jeopardy!, which later in 1984 when it returned, became its current companion in syndication.)

    The rules of the game Three contestants -- at various times during the run, including a returning champion -- compete. The host announces a category to a mystery puzzle (person, place, thing, phrase, quotation, event, landmark, occupation, etc.). The puzzle was originally contained on a three-tier, 36-space board (in 1981, changed to a four-tier, 52-space board; and in 1997, an all-electronic four-tier, 52-space board).

    The contestant selected to go first (by blind draw before the show) spin a large horizontally-situated carnival wheel containing dollar amounts and other spaces (including Bankrupt, Lose a Turn and Free Spin). If the contestant landed on a dollar amount, he/she could guess a letter thought to be in the puzzle; if it appeared, they received the cash multiplied by the number of times it appears in the puzzle (ergo, if the player guessed "T" after landing on $250, and "T" appeared twice, they received $500). An incorrect guess or landing on a penalty space (Bankrupt or Lose a Turn) caused control of the wheel to pass to the next contestant.

    At any point, the contestant in control of the wheel could spin again, ask to buy a vowel (at which point $250 was deducted from their score, and only if they had at least $250) or attempt to solve the puzzle; very early in the show's run, a player had to land on a Buy a Vowel space in order to buy a vowel, but this idea was scrapped before Wheel completed its first month on the air. The Bankrupt space caused the player to lose his accumulated winnings for that round (though all previous winnings were considered safe -- hence, "Once you buy a prize, it's yours to keep").

    If the player correctly guessed the puzzle's solution, he/she got to keep their accumulated winnings. Any contestant solving the puzzle and not having at least $100 (later $200 and still later, $500) was spotted that amount "on the house." Early rounds typically had lower dollar values on the wheel ($500 as a top space on round 1 early in the run/Bob Goen version, later that was changed to $750), but increased in subsequent rounds ($1,000 and $2,000 for the later rounds, to increase the excitement; $1,250 when Bob Goen hosted).

    Originally, the winnings were used to "go shopping" (i.e., purchase prizes) in one of the three revolving rooms on the set -- each containing: * Furniture -- enough to fill any room in the house, from the living room and dining room to bedroom or game room. * Appliances -- large and small, enough to make that dream kitchen or efficient laundry room. * Things for outside -- everything from swimming pools and patio furniture to barbecues, lawn games and garden equipment. * Clothing -- for every occasion. * Trips -- to any place imaginable, domestic or foreign. And don't forget the luggage and camera outfits. * Electronics -- TVs, stereos and much more! The show was among the first to offer early versions of VCRs (c. 1976), home video game units (c. 1978, Atari) and satellite dishes (late-1970s). * Gift Certificates -- everywhere to restaurants (Bonanza, Dairy Queen), clothing outlets (Casual Corner) and any other store (Western Auto). * Food -- from steaks from the Iowa Beef Council and chocolates to items from the Dessert of the Month Club. * Overall comfort and fun -- from a central air conditioning system and pinball machines to hot tubs and pizza parties. * Miscellaneous items -- everything from magazine subscriptions and collections of LPs from a record label to those famous ceramnic dalmations. and MUCH more.

    There were other announced prizes, usually worth much more than in the revolving rooms. While some prizes offered during the early years were no doubt unusual (such as rare antiques and African masks), the favorite prize, of course, were the cars. In the daytime show, there were two or three available, usually, a sports model (such as a Chevrolet Camaro) and an economy model (a Chevrolet Monza), but there were also more upmarket family cars (the Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme) and exotic foreign cars (a Lancia Beta coupe).

    Other top-ticket items proving popular were: * Other forms of transportation -- everything from boats, motorcycles and camping trailers. There was even, at one time, a 4-seat airplane and a motorhome available! * Furs -- before the animal rights groups got their way. * Jewelry -- everything from rings, necklaces, pearls, earrings, watches and much more!

    Starting in 1987 (primetime) and 1989 (daytime), the winner of a round received his accumulated bank in cash (thanks to beefs from contestants who had to pay steep taxes and preferred cash). During the shopping era, a contestant could elect to place any unused cash "on account" (which they could claim only upon winning a subsequent round AND avoiding the bankrupt space in the meantime); otherwise, unused winnings were placed on a gift certificate (usually to Gucci, Dicker and Dicker of Beverly Hills or another luxury shop seen on Rodeo Drive).

    If time ran short (signified by a series of "dings"), a "speed up" round was played, wherein the host gave the wheel one final spin, with vowels worth nothing and all consonants worth whatever the host landed on. The top-winning contestant after so many rounds completed within each show was the day's champion. In case of a tie, one of several things happened, depending on the year:

    * At first, all three players returned on the next show (even the third-place player). Everyone kept what they won on all shows. * Later, the two (or possibly all three) tied players played a one-round speedround to determine the champion. This format was used once the permanent bonus round was started.

    End Game - The Bonus Round At first, there was no bonus round, the top winner simply returned. Starting in 1981, the champion advanced to a bonus round, where they could select a prize (always worth $1,000 or more and signified with a gold star (or announced in some other way)) and, after choosing five consonants and one vowel, had 15 seconds to solve the puzzle.

    Prior to the bonus round becoming a permanent part of the game, there were several special weeks where bonus rounds were played. Games included (but not limited to):

    * 1975 hour-long format Bonus Round - Played during Wheel's short-lived 60-minute format, the day's overall winner selected one of four puzzles (labeled easy, medium, difficult and hard); the level of difficulty determined the prize (e.g., an easy puzzle may have been worth a TV-stereo console, while the difficult puzzle may have won the player a new Cadillac). The player then chose four consonants and a vowel and tried to solve the puzzle within 15 seconds. This is very similar to the current bonus round, except the level of difficulty did not necessarily correspond with the prize's value.

    * Any Prize in the House - The top winner simply chose a prize and they got it.

    * Star Bonus - By landing on a special token on the wheel, a contestant had the opportunity to advance to a special bonus round if they were one of the runners-up. That player could become champion by solving a puzzle and winning a prize that was worth more than the amount of the first-place player's lead. As with the 60-minute format's bonus round, the prize's value corresponded with the difficulty of the puzzle.

    This short-lived format wasn't always played, however, since the Star Bonus token sometimes wasn't landed on the entire show; the token could serve as insurance for a dominating player who wins the game (and possibly purchases the most-expensive prize, thereby making it unavailable for the opponents); or the expensive prize's value was not worth enough to cover the difference between the champion's winnings and his/her opponents.

    The rules of other games varied, but usually, the show had a bigger prize budget than during regular weeks.

    Changes through the years Many changes were made through the years, some very successful (luxury prizes in the syndicated version; $25,000 cash top bonus round prize), while others weren't (e.g., a "Doubler" token, which allowed contestants to double the potential value of the next spin; Rolf Benirschke as host of the daytime show; the infamous Megaword category, where a contestant had to correctly use the revealed word in a coherent sentence for an extra $500). Some of the more successful changes are detailed below.

    * For the syndicated version, decidedly luxury prizes were often advertised ("This $41,000 customized Cadillac Seville! "A $60,000 log cabin!" "A $25,000 trip around the world!"); plus a silver $5,000 space on the wheel's third round (replacing the $2,000 daytime show top space, though early syndicated shows had both the $2,000 and $5,000 spaces). Also, a bonus prize space was added in the second round of the syndicated show (and in 1987, a different bonus to the fourth round).

    * Meanwhile, in the daytime show, a "Jackpot" bonus space was added to the second round in 1987; it based at $1,000 and grew by $1,000 per show until claimed.

    * With the syndicated show's change to an all-cash format in 1987, the bonus round changed to having four (or sometimes, as many as six) grand prizes and $25,000 cash available as prizes. Originally meant to be a month-long promotion (the "Big Bonanza of Cash" before reverting to the tried-and-true post-puzzle shopping), this well-received format allowed more rounds – save for celebrity week gabfests, always at least four – to be played. Originally, the top wheel values were set thusly:

    - Round 1: $1,000. - Round 2: $2,500 (plus a bonus prize). - Round 3: $3,500. - Round 4-on: $5,000 (plus a bonus prize for Round 4 only, if time permits; sometimes, the bonus was used in Round 3 instead).

    This has since been changed, with the current setup as follows:

    - Round 1: $2,500, plus an $1,000 online shopping spree card that is placed on the wheel for the rest of the show a la the Free Spin, and may be picked up if a letter is correctly guessed. - Round 2: $3,500, plus a bonus prize, which remains on the wheel until a contestant picks it up. Until 2002, additional bonus prizes were placed on the wheel in subsequent rounds. – Round 3: $3,500, plus the Mystery Round spaces. - Round 4-on: $5,000, including the speed round.

    * During the 1988-1989 season, the contestant was given the six most popular letters -- R, S, T, L, N and E, and asked to select three more consonants and one vowel; the bonus round time limit was then shortened to 10 seconds.

    * Starting in 1989 (since $25,000 cash was far and away the most popular prize choice), the five grand prizes were placed in a blind draw, and could only be won once per week.

    * In 1996, the "returning champions" idea was scrapped, with a "Friday Finals" format instituted. Three new contestants appeared Monday through Thursday, with the week's top winners returning on Friday (regardless if they were their show's top winner) to play for a jackpot prize package. The latter format lasted only a couple of seasons before it, too, was scuttled.

    * In the 1990s, a Surprise space was added to the wheel, which was simply a prize that was announced only if won (usually a trip); this space has since been scrapped.

    * In the mid-1990s, a Jackpot round (third round initially, later the second round) allowed a contestant to claim an accumulating jackpot -- which based at $5,000 and accumulated with each dollar space landed on -- if they landed on a Jackpot space, correctly guessed a letter and solved the puzzle all in the same turn.

    * A few years after the jackpot round, a $10,000 space added to the wheel. The space was not multipliable; rather, it simply added $10,000 to the contestant's winnings if they solved the puzzle and avoided bankrupt. The space took up the center third of a standard wheel space, with two bankrupt spaces taking up the remainder (to add to the suspense). If the $10,000 part of the space was landed on and the contestant guessed correctly, it was placed face down in front of the contestant to read $10,000 (unlike the standard prize space, which was left face up).

    * "Toss Up" puzzles -- to determine who started the game -- were added prior to the first and fourth rounds, starting in the 2000-2001 season, each worth $1,000; a year later, two "Toss Up" puzzles were played, once before the contestant introductions and the second (now worth $2,000) to determine first round wheel control, with the pre-fourth round "Toss Up" now worth $3,000. If a contestant made an incorrect guess, he/she was out of the remainder of the puzzle; if all the letters were filled in or everyone guessed wrong, nobody won anything and wheel control began either with the left-most contestant or wherever it left off before.

    * During the 2000-2001 season, the "speed up" round was changed, wherein $1,000 was added to whatever dollar amount Sajak landed on. There was some cool music added, too.

    * Changes to the Bonus Round in October 2001. The contestant spun a mini- wheel containing 25 envelopes; Sajak removed the envelope; and win or lose, revealed the prize contained within (a car, $25,000 cash or a new top prize of $100,000; the top prize was contained in just one of the envelopes). In 2002-2003, more money amounts (one each of amounts between $30,000 and $50,000, each in $5,000 increments) were thrown into the mix. There have been at least five $100,000 winners and several others who have not been quite as fortunate.

    * Starting in 2002-2003, contestants who won nothing during the front game were given $500 just for playing (in addition to those lovely parting gifts).

    * A new Mystery space, added in the 2002-2003 season. Played in Round 3, two such spaces were placed on the wheel, with a $500 dollar value. Contestants landing on this space guessed a letter could either spin again or risk their accumulated bank, not knowing what's on the other side of the Mystery card. It could be Bankrupt or a new car (on occasion, it could be another prize, such as a $10,000 shopping spree). If it was a car, the contestant had to solve the puzzle and avoid the Bankrupt spaces to claim the car. The other Mystery space was then put out of play, becoming a regular $500 space. In September 2004, the values of the Mystery spaces dooubled to $1,000.

    A prize puzzle, added in the 2003-2004 season. One puzzle on each show (usually the second or third round) had some connection to a prize the contestant would win for solving the puzzle. For example, a contestant solving the puzzle "Check Your Local Listings" could win a plasma wall-screen television. The set underwent some revisions, too.

    Chuck and Susan and Pat and Vanna When the show started in 1975, Chuck Woolery was the host. For a brief time in the fall of 1979, Alex Trebek served as substitute host when Woolery took a leave of absence. In 1981, Woolery left for good when he was denied a pay raise (he wanted $500,000 per year, more than Merv Griffin was willing to offer. Chuck left, and Pat Sajak replaced him. Most of the Chuck Woolery episodes are hard to find, due to NBC's practice of destroying tapes from old shows. On the daytime version, ex-football star Benirschke on January 10, 1989, but he didn't work out too well. When the show moved from NBC to CBS, 6 months later, Bob Goen became the host, and was the host for two years (the show moved back to NBC in 1991 for 9 months). Pat Sajak still hosts the nighttime syndicated version.

    Susan Stafford was the original "letter turner." She was replaced by Summer Bartholemew on October 22, 1982, then Vicky McCarty three weeks later. (None of the Summer Bartholemew episodes exist due to NBC's practice of destroying tapes of old shows.) On December 13, 1982, McCarty left, and Vanna White became the new permanent hostess (BTW -- Vanna's first letter turned was a "T," in the puzzle "General Hospital"). As most game show fans know, this is not Vanna's first appearance on a game show. In June 1980, 2 1/2 years before her first appearance on Wheel of Fortune, America's favorite hostess was a contestant on The Price is Right in 1980, but she never left contestant's row (BTW – as a recurring joke, TPiR former icon/host Bob Barker always wondered aloud whatever became of her).

    Originally, Vanna rarely spoke on-camera (though she occasionally engaged in small talk with Pat at the end of the show); back then, Sajak would be introduced and then he would introduce Vanna, who always showed off a different dress or outfit (and for the record, no, she did NOT get to keep her clothes, which always come from the most glamorous of shops). However, as Vanna gained acclaim with the viewing audience, she talked more and more. Today, both Pat and Vanna walk out together and they always conversate after each program. Vanna often does the car prize descriptions prior to each bonus round.

    Charlie O'Donnell as the original announcer when Wheel of Fortune began. He left in 1982, and Jack Clark (who had earlier announced on occasion) took over full-time. Clark died of cancer in 1988 (Sajak offered a tribute to the long-time announcer in the 1988-1989 syndicated season premiere), and after a five-month stint by M.G. Kelly, O'Donnell returned, his trademark phrasing "WH-EEEEEEE-L OF FORTUNE" and "25 THOOOOOOOOOUSAND DOLLARS" intact.

    Retrospectives and going on the road Several tributes to the series have been shown through the years, most commonly as part of daytime talk shows and occasional bloopers specials. During its syndicated run, Wheel of Fortune has aired two retrospectives of its own - the first in November 1998, to mark its 3,000th show; and again in November 2003, when its 4,000th show aired, as part of a series of shows taped in New York.

    Speaking of which, Wheel of Fortune has gone "on the road" all over the country to tape shows. Among the first aired in November 1988, when the show taped from New York's Radio City Music Hall (legendary NBC announcer Don Pardo did voiceovers). Other cities have included (but are not limited to) Chicago, Nashville, Phoenix and Honolulu; and many of those episodes were part of special theme weeks (such as Best Friends Week) or have paired contestants with celebrities from a particular genre (e.g., NFL football players, country music stars).

    From Hangman to Wheel and everything in between The idea for the game show that eventually became Wheel of Fortune grew from a game known as Shopper's Bazaar. Two such pilots were produced – one in 1973 with Woolery as host, the other (from 1974) helmed by Edd Byrnes (best known as "Kookie" from the 1958-1964 detective drama, 77 Sunset Strip). The rules for the earlier pilot, hosted by Woolery, was quite different from the game we all came to know and love (e.g., a self-spinning wheel and the host pressing a button at the contestant's direction; prize money carried over to subsequent rounds and always "at risk;" etc.).

    The later pilot, hosted by Byrnes and a more talkative Stafford, was similar to what viewers first saw in 1975. When Merv Griffin Enterprises made their final plans to enter production in late 1974, a host had yet to be chosen. The story goes that Griffin's decision was made when he saw the producer's first choice, Byrnes, in the hallways prior to the taping of the first shows, repeating "A-E-I-O-U, A-E-I-O-U;" in an attempt to recall the vowels.

    It's the 60-minute Wh-e-e-e-e-e-e-e-e-l of Fortune In December 1975, a month after The Price is Right became a one-hour show, NBC experimented with an hour-long version of Wheel of Fortune.

    The game played thusly: Two sets of three contestants compete in three-round games each, as usual, with the returning champion playing in the second set of games. The top money winners of each three-round match met in a one-puzzle showdown for the right to advance to the bonus round (described above).

    The hour-long Wheel of Fortune lasted but a month, and returned to the 30-minute game we all came to love by the end of January 1976. BTW, several other NBC game show hits, including The Hollywood Squares, also briefly expanded to 60 minutes as part of the networks' promotion.

    Syndication Wheel of Fortune's phenomenal run in syndication almost never happened. As early as the fall of 1975, there was interest in producing a weekly nighttime show, but few syndicators were wanting to try and even fewer stations willing to buy, particularly because there were other powerhouse game shows airing (either Match Game PM or Family Feud, depending on the year) that were seen as insurmountable in the ratings.

    In 1983, King World Productions – a small-time distributor that had edited Our Gang shorts for television airing – took a chance on the show ... and it paid off royally! Airing on just 59 stations when the premiere aired Sept. 19, 1983, Wheel of Fortune (often pitted against latter-day Dawson's Family Feud) quickly soared in the ratings and within two years, was airing on nearly 200 stations and began its (thus far) permanent reign as the nation's top syndicated program. Jeopardy! rates second, with Friends reruns currently the shows' closest competitor.

    Wheel across the world (and (yuck) a kid's version, too) As Wheel of Fortune grew in popularity during the mid-1980s, countries all over the world began staging their own versions; each had their own "Pat and Vanna," and minor rules changes. Clips of these international versions are seen from time to time on the U.S. version.

    Also, a children's version of the program under the name Wheel 2000 also aired on CBS during the 1997-1998 season (with many modifications, see page for details).

    Merchandising Merchandise ... thy name is Wheel of Fortune. Even in the mid-1970s, there were two editions of the home game issued by Milton Bradley (complete with wheel, puzzle board and prize cards).

    But that was just the beginning, as by the mid-1980s, there were T-shirts, key chains, calendars and even an album of prize cue music featured on the show. Vanna merchandise also appeared, including her biography "Vanna Speaks."

    Home video games - from electronic hand-held units to cartridges and CD-ROMs for units that connect to TV - have also been highly popular (and have seen, in addition to subsequent editions with more puzzles and categories, special editions for children and sports fans).

    And through it all, one thing has not changed -- a vowel still costs you $250 (except during the Bob Goen network era/1989-91 CBS and 1991 NBC, when those A's, E's, I's, O's and U's cost just $100).moreless
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    The Young and the Restless

    The Young and the Restless

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    CBS
    The Young and the Restless revolves around the rivalries, romances, hopes and fears of the residents of the fictional Midwestern metropolis, Genoa City. The lives and loves of a wide variety of characters mingle through the generations, dominated by the Newman, Abbott and Winters families. When the show premiered in 1973, it revolutionized the daytime drama. It continues to set the standard with strong characters, socially conscious storylines, romance and sensuality. The Young and the Restless premiered on March 26, 1973, and was originally a 30 minute show. It was not until January 1980 that the show had become a one hour show like it is today. The show has ran for years at 12:30 PM on the east coast, and at 11:00 AM on the west coast. Over the years, many things have happened, and there have been many twisted story lines, many stolen husbands, and many people dead. It has also featured character cross-overs with another CBS soap, The Bold and the Beautiful. These include the psychotic Sheila Carter, who began on The Young and the Restless and shown her more psychotic side on The Bold and the Beautiful. The same goes for Lauren Fenmore, who also can be seen on The Bold and the Beautiful occasionally. The Young and the Restless is not like other soaps which convey a surreal way of life. This show, however, is based on the lives of people in a small town called Genoa City, Wisconsin, where the money is plentiful and so are the women. Many times, we wish that we could live in that small, mid-western town, just to see how life would really be like. Sometimes, we put our own problems aside and worry about what will happen next on the show. However, we're very fortunate not to have a world like they do on any soap! The theme song was written by Barry DeVorzon and Perry Botkin, and originally entitled Cotton's Theme from the film Bless the Beasts, but later became known as Nadia's Theme.moreless
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    The Simpsons

    The Simpsons

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    FOX
    This is the 25th Treehouse of Horror in the Simpsons organized by Matt Groening. It is divided in three parts. Fox also said that one of the main characters will die in season 25. Bart loses his head and then finds it attached to Lisa's. Together they go to second grade and at night Bart finds out that when Lisa sleeps he is in control of her body. The Simpsons kids are sick and can't have candy or go trick or treating, but then comes the Fat in the hat (who is basically Homer) and takes them to the streets. Later Bart, Lisa, and Maggie try to escape because Fat in the Hat wants them to stay with him forever. A parody of cat in the hat of Dr. Seuss' rhyme books. At the long time ago circus Strongman Homer wants to take the devil creator's (Moe's) emerald, so he makes Marge marry him to later kill him, but Marge doesn't want to kill Moe, so she dumps Strongman. Meanwhile, a group of circus clowns and monsters kill Mr.Burns and take over the circus. moreless
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    The Suite Life of Zack & Cody

    The Suite Life of Zack & Cody

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    Disney Channel (ended 2008)
    The Suite Life of Zack and Cody stars identical twin brothers Dylan and Cole Sprouse, as Zack and Cody, whose lives change when their mother Carey (Kim Rhodes), ends up landing a job at one of Boston's finest hotels, the Tipton Hotel. As part of Carey's contractual deal, the twins and her get to live in an upper floor suite of the hotel. Ashley Michelle Tisdale stars as Maddie Fitzpatrick, who plays the role of the hotel candy counter girl and part-time babysitter, that tends to having to put an end to Zack and Cody's antics. Brenda Song stars as the rich and spoiled hotel heiress, London Tipton; while Phill Lewis plays the role of Mr. Moseby, the Tipton Hotel Manager. While Zack and Cody's mother works, they have all the amenities that come with the hotel, like room service, the game room, the swimming pool, and the candy counter. Maddie steps up as being the babysitter for the twin boys who tries to foil their pranks, along with the job of being the Tipton's candy counter girl. Zack and Cody try to turn the hotel into the play ground, as they end up making friends and foes with guest, staff, and residents; which includes the spoiled hotel heiress, London Tipton. The show was originally called The Suite Life, which is co-created by Danny Kallis, who was a writer, producer, and director for the TV series, Smart Guy; and Jim Geoghan, who was a writer and producer for the TV series, Family Matters. Anything To Contribute To This Guide... ...any notes, quotes, goofs, etc., click on the "add" or "edit" icons on the various pages and fill out the forms! And please! Watch your spelling, punctuation grammar, etc.! Submissions that are full of errors have NO chance of being included! Information About The Suite Life of Zack & Cody Main Characters... Zack - The always stylin' Zack is the major instigator of the mischief that he and his brother, Cody, get into. He always means well, but sometimes the excitement of the situation gets the best of him. Cody - The super-friendly Cody is usually reluctant to participate in his brother Zack's schemes. But when he does, his good influence helps to reign Zack in when things get out of hand. Carey - Zack and Cody's mom is the headline singer at the Tipton Hotel's exclusive cabaret room. She's a great mom but has her hands full with the troublemaking twosome. London - As the wealthy daughter of the Tipton Hotel owner, London spends her tome showing off new outfits and acting like the hotel's princess. Even though she is the complete opposite of Maddie, they're still good friends. Maddie - Maddie is the Tipton Hotel candy counter girl-turned-part-time Zack and Cody babysitter. Her quick thinking often helps the twins out of some sticky situations. Mr. Moseby - Mr. Moseby, the Tipton Hotel's manager, tries to keep Zack and Code in line, but sometimes the boys get the best of him. With his strict ways, he often spoils their fun while saving the Tipton from their hijinks. Frequently Asked Questions About The Suite Life of Zack & Cody... Q. When did the show premiere? A. The show first premiered Friday, March 18, 2005 on Disney Channel at 7:00|6:00C with two back-to-back episodes. Q. When did the first production begin? A. Production began on September 14, 2004, in front of a live studio audience at 5:30PM at the Hollywood Center in Hollywood, California. The show is filmed in the same studio as Disney Channel's hit show That's So Raven. Q. When will new information become available? A. As soon as Disney releases new information, we'll post it for you. New episodes and air dates will be posted in the episode list or in the broadcast schedule. Q. When did the name change from 'The Suite Life' to 'The Suite Life of Zack and Cody'? A. The name changed at the Television Critics Association (TCA) Press Tour in Los Angeles on January 14, 2005. Q. When did DisneyChannel.com premiere the official website/webpage? A. DisneyChannel.com launched the site/page on Friday, January 21, 2005; the same night that American Dragon: Jake Long premiered. It is updated regularly. Q. Do you need any more editors? A. No, we don't. We have enough now. But you can contribute. Other Information About The Suite Life of Zack & Cody... Theme Song... Here I am in your life Here you are in mine Guess we have a suite life, most of the time You and me, we got the world to see So come on down, just me and you know what to do So come on down, its you and me, me and you We got the whole place to ourselves, you and me We got it all for free, so come on down This is the suite life, we have a suite life Birthdays Of The Suite Life Of Zack & Cody Stars... Cole Sprouse (Cody) - August 4, 1992 Dylan Sprouse (Zack) - August 4, 1992 Brenda Song (London) - September 24, 1987 Ashley Tisdale (Maddie) - July 2, 1985 Phill Lewis (Mr. Moseby) - ? ?, 1968 Kim Rhodes (Carey) - June 7, 1969moreless
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    White Collar

    White Collar

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    USA (ended 2014)
    This is a show about a convicted white collar criminal who winds up working for the FBI man who caught him. To stay out of prison, convicted bond forger Neal Caffrey offers to help the FBI capture other white collar criminals using his expertise as an art and securities thief, counterfeiter and racketeer.moreless
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    The Resident

    The Resident

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    FOX
    The Resident' is a medical drama which centers on an idealistic young doctor who begins his first day under the supervision of a tough, brilliant senior resident who pulls the curtain back on all of the good and evil in modern day medicine. Lives may be saved or lost, but expectations will always be shattered.moreless
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    Tom and Jerry Kids Show

    Tom and Jerry Kids Show

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    FOX (ended 1994)
    Cat-and-mouse duo Tom and Jerry have been entertaining viewers with cartoon violence for decades. In this series that originally aired in the 1990s, younger versions of the animals are featured with Tom, as in the classic cartoons, trying to catch naughty mouse Jerry. Since it is geared more to kids than adults, the violence level is toned down a bit compared to the original series. The Tom and Jerry spin-offs are Tom and Jerry and The New Tom and Jerry Show. Tom and Jerry First Appeared on FOX On September 23, 1990. And Ended on November 27, 1994. The Tom and Jerry Kids Show, now airs on Cartoon Network and Boomerang.
    Characters

    Tom: Tom is the cat. His enemy is Jerry. That's why they always fight, and play tricks together. And sometimes when they're in danger together, they put aside their differences and decide to help out each other.

    Jerry: Jerry is the mouse. His enemy is Tom. That's why they are always fighting, and playing tricks on each other. Jerry also likes to play tricks on Tom.

    Spike: Spike is the Dog. He always takes care of his son Tyke, and makes sure that Tom never gets within ten feet of him. If Tom does then he pays the price.

    Tyke: Tyke is Spike's son. He always enjoys spending time with his dad. And doesn't like when Tom gets in the way.

    McWolf: McWolf is a sneaky little wolf whenever Droopy and Dripple are on adventures, he is there to stop them from doing what they've got to do. But even thought he tries, they always seem to catch up and win.

    Droopy: Droopy is Dripple's father and is always ready to go on adventures with his son Dripple.

    Dripple: Dripple is Droopy's son. And is always ready to go on adventures with his dad Droopy.moreless
  • 15
    World's Wildest Police Videos

    World's Wildest Police Videos

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    Spike TV
    World's Wildest Police Videos examines criminals at their dumbest who are caught on tape. It includes police pursuits, robberies, and routine traffic stops gone bad.
  • 16
    Tyler Perry's Meet The Browns

    Tyler Perry's Meet The Browns

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    TBS (ended 2011)
    Tyler Perry's Meet the Browns, a spin-off of Tyler Perry's House of Payne, stars Mr. Leroy Brown (David Mann) as he transforms his inherited, ramshackle house into Brown Meadows, a senior citizen home. Brown gets more than he bargained for with eccentric residents, employees trying to keep their lives on track, and the next door fraternity house.moreless
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    UFC Unleashed

    UFC Unleashed

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    Fuel TV
    Mike Goldberg hosts UFC Unleashed, a show that highlights premium Ultimate Fighting Championship matches. Each episode shows the best fights in the UFC archives as well as legendary fighters, previous Ultimate Fighter winners, and the best knockouts.moreless
  • 18
    The Save-Ums

    The Save-Ums

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    Discovery Channel Kids (ended 2006)
    The Save-Ums live in a fantastical universe made up of deep sea worlds and remote islands. They keep watch over the universe from the headquarters at Save-Ums Central and rescue those in need of help. Working as a team using each other's strengths, the Save-Ums ensure that they get the best results and teach valuable lessons along the way. Join Noodle, Ka-Chung, Jazzi, Foo, Custard, and B.B. Jammies as they save the day! The Save-Ums are cute, small and always ready for action. They are tiny superheroes who prove that you don't have to be big to pack a punch. They are always on the lookout for the opportunity to save the day and are dedicated to helping all creatures. Characters (The Save-Ums) Noodle: A hound dog-like creature who is the most intelligent of the group, and is the most mature, often being the voice of reason letting others see what is right. He often chooses the machines needed for the job and pilots the Subchopper. Custard: A cat-eared Save-Um who pilots the Zoomer, and goes on most of the missions. Ka-Chung: A hippopotamus-like creature who is one of the toughest Save-Ums; as his name implies, he is well known to shout "Ka-Chung!" as his catchphrase. He pilots the Ka-Drill. Jazzi: An enthusiastic girl who dreams to speak the language of wild horses. She is afraid of water and is shown to be the leader in numerous episodes. She also looks out for her younger brother B.B. Jammies, but all the Save-Ums look out for him as well. Foo: An angelfish-like creature who is the nicest of the Save-Ums and goes on most of the missions. She flies a jet pack. B.B. Jammies: Jazzi's younger brother, who has a purple American football-shaped head. Since he is too young to go on missions, he mostly plays with the Puffs.moreless
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    When Calls the Heart
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    The X-Files

    The X-Files

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    FOX (ended 2018)
    The X-Files is a Peabody, Golden Globe and Emmy Award-winning American science fiction television series created by Chris Carter, which first aired on September 10, 1993, and ended on May 19, 2002. Running for 9 seasons, the show was a hit for the Fox Broadcasting Company network, and its main characters and slogans (e.g., "The Truth Is Out There", "Trust No One", "I Want to Believe") became pop culture touchstones. The X-Files is seen as a defining series of the 1990s, coinciding with the era's widespread mistrust of governments, interest in conspiracy theories and spirituality, and the belief in the existence of extraterrestrial life. TV Guide called The X-Files the Second greatest cult television show and the 37th best television show of all time. In 2007, Time magazine included it on a list of the "100 Best TV Shows of All Time." In 2008, Entertainment Weekly named it Classic Sci-fi and the fourth best TV show in the last 25 years. This long running FOX drama lasted nine seasons and focused on the exploits of FBI Agents Fox Mulder, Dana Scully, John Doggett and Monica Reyes and their investigations into the paranormal. From genetic mutants and killer insects to a global conspiracy concerning the colonisation of Earth by an alien species, this mind-boggling, humourous and occasionally frightening series created by Chris Carter has been one of the world's most popular sci-fi/drama shows since its humble beginnings in 1993. The show has also spawned two movies, The X-Files Movie in 1998 and I Want To Believe in 2008. So sit back and enjoy the fascinating world of The X-Files. The entire nine seasons of The X-Files are now available on DVD! As well has hundreds of books written about the show. Emmy Awards 2001 - Outstanding Makeup for a Series for episode DeadAlive 2000 - Outstanding Makeup for a Series for episode Theef - Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Drama Series for episode First Person Shooter - Outstanding Special Visual Effects for a Series for episode First Person Shooter 1999 - Outstanding Makeup for a series for episodes Two Fathers/One Son 1998 - Outstanding Art Direction for a Series for episode The Post-Modern Prometheus - Outstanding Single Camera Picture Editing for a Series for episode Kill Switch 1997 - Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series for Gillian Anderson - Outstanding Art Direction for a Series for episode Memento Mori - Outstanding Sound Editing for a Series for episode Tempus Fugit 1996 - Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series to Peter Boyle for episode Clyde Bruckman's Final Repose - Outstanding Individual Achievement in Writing for a Drama Series to Darin Morgan for episode Clyde Bruckman's Final Repose - Outstanding Individual Achievement in Cinematography for a series for episode Grotesque - Outstanding Individual Achievement in Sound Editing for a Series for episode Nisei - Outstanding individual Achievement in Sound Mixing for a Drama Series for episode Nisei 1994 - Outstanding Individual Achievement in Graphic Design and Title Sequences for The X-Files Golden Globe Awards 1998 - Best TV Series (Drama) 1997 - Best Performance by an Actor in a TV Series (Drama) to David Duchovny - Best Performance by an Actress in a TV-Series (Drama) to Gillian Anderson - Best TV Series (Drama) 1995 - Best TV Series (Drama) In March 2015 it was announced that the show will return for a 6 episode limited series with both Duchovny and Anderson reprising their roles after a 13 year hiatus. Chris Carter is on board to write and produce these episodes. Season 10 began airing from January 24th 2016. It is rumoured the show could be renewed for further seasons due to the success of season 10.moreless
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